• High School
  • Student Experience
Creativity Activity Service

CAS projects are an opportunity for students to develop their leadership skills, collaborate with peers or members of the community, and improve their skills in a chosen area. Each project must be a minimum of one-month and usually combine two of the three strands of Creativity, Activity and Service.

Rules of the Road: Parking Lot Safety Video 

Daphne L. (Grade 12)

The school parking lot can be a bit chaotic during pick-up and drop-off. Or, as Grade 12 student Daphne puts it, “kind of a nightmare”. Seeing it for herself each morning and afternoon and hearing her mom’s complaints, she was struck with a unique idea for her CAS Project: a parking lot safety video. Equal parts creativity and service, Daphne hoped to use her talent for filmography to keep members of our community safe (and herself and her peers to class on time!). Daphne started exploring film when she was eight years old and now even leads film camps herself. So while filming was no issue, there was one slight obstacle… she doesn’t drive. Daphne took time to learn the ins and outs of driving and navigating the parking lot by speaking to school administration, parents, and students. She learned of their major concerns and used them to form her safety tips and shot list. “My goal was to make the parking lot slightly less chaotic and improve the experience,” she shares.

Watch Daphne's parking lot safety video ► 

Best part
Editing the video and using Adobe Premiere Pro, which I got just recently but have been too busy with schoolwork to really use.

Worst part
Filming the video in the hot August sun wearing a wool sweater. Also, deciding to film the video the day before exams.

What I learned 
How to adapt. I needed to work with different people and make sense of the rules. It was something new that I had to practice at.

What’s next 
I’m working on films for my university applications and working on a personal short in my spare time. It’s a movie inspired by a Chinese, mythological horror story.

Building Community: Translation Services 

Linda Z., Jason D. & Nick L. (Grade 12)

Linda, Jason, and Nick understand the importance of knowing the place you call home. Having only been in Canada for a collective 13 years – Linda and Nick moved here in Grade 7, Jason in Grade 9 – all three of them have spent lots of time getting to know new places. Doing so not only helped them settle in and appreciate their new homes more fully, but also inspired their CAS Project focus: translating local museum websites and brochures. Linda, Jason, and Nick remember visiting local museums when they first arrived in Maple Ridge and realizing their parents, and other people just like them, couldn’t read the English materials. They wanted to learn about our history, cultures, and people, but couldn’t. Fluent in both Chinese and English, the group members saw an opportunity to help. Linda, Jason, and Nick started emailing local museums and began working with them to provide translated materials. Though translations can be tough, the group enjoyed finding the meanings of things, choosing the right words, and “playing with language.” Thanks to their efforts, the histories of our local areas can be learned by many more people for years to come. “Learning the history of a place is a basic respect,” the group nods, “and it’s really important in building understanding and connection.”

Best part
Taking the time to find the right word or translate a tricky sentence. Though some sentences can take lots of time, there’s nothing more satisfying than figuring out how to translate it at last. It was also great to learn about some of Maple Ridge’s unique stories. We had a pirate arrested in Whonnock, and a train robber named Billy Miner. 

Worst part
Finishing a really tricky sentence, then scrolling down and seeing how many more paragraphs of them you have left! 

What I learned 
Stepping out of our comfort zones and communicating with people you wouldn’t normally talk to. We learned how to talk to strangers, how to submit proposals, and how to refine our language. 

What’s next 
If the museums need us, we will definitely help. We are already thinking of other helpful things to translate—exhibit labels, for example—and are thinking of making a translated video tour of some of the museums.

The Meadowridge Debate Tournament 

Akira Y., Peter Y. & Isabella Z. (Grade 12)

Peter knew had a good CAS project in mind, but he also knew he needed help to make it happen. It would be, he realized, a large undertaking with lots of planning and organization involved. After Isabella offered to help (“he kind of dragged me in,” she laughs) and then Akira, he had not only a plan, but also a talented team to make it happen. Together, the three students would plan Meadowridge School’s first ever debate tournament. Peter, Isabella, and Akira each brought their own abilities, but admit it was an entirely collaborative process with everyone helping whenever and wherever was needed. With some help from Peter’s debate coach, the three made all the plans, wrote all the schedules, launched registration, and started advertising and outreach. “It was a good team effort” they nod. With the website and registration launched, the team reached out to local academies, other schools, and their peers. With each day, more and more teams signed up. All the while, the team was also hard at work hiring professional judges. 

Their efforts paid off, and the team welcomed 60 teams and 35 judges over the two day tournament.

Best part 
Seeing all the teams register. One email after the next, seeing participants and judges sign up was very satisfying.

Worst part
Advertising is the absolute worst. People don’t care or listen, and you’re expected to grab their attention. .

What I learned 
Event management and learning how to plan and get people to actually come. Really, it’s about learning to manage people. We learned how to communicate with each other, with teachers, with the school administration, with judges and with other debaters. 

What’s next 
A spring tournament! That’s next. We want to make this a seasonal event. Also, after we graduate, we want this to continue. We don’t want this to just die out.